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Andreas Stamm

German Development Institute/ Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)

Andreas Stamm is an economic geographer and holds a PhD from Marburg University. After his PhD and following five years of working at the National University of Costa Rica and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) he joined DIE in 1998. His work covers aspects of value chain development and sustainability standards, sustainable public procurement, national quality infrastructure and the role of science, technology & innovation, including digitalisation, for economic, industrial and social development. From 2013 to 2015 he was on leave from DIE to manage the Ethiopian-German technical cooperation project “National Quality infrastructure” in Addis Ababa.
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publication
Inclusive and sustainable agriculture in Costa Rica - a quality label to promote solidarity-based trade

Compared to other Latin American countries, Costa Rica has good indicators for economic growth and social development. Historically, it has managed to combine inward growth with intelligent use of the options offered by international markets. In recent decades, the country has undergone a strong structural change, with new export activities generating well-paying jobs and accelerated urbanization. While this has allowed for solid economic growth rates, it has also meant an increase in social inequality and greater territorial disparities. A considerable part of the population living in Costa Rica’s rural areas feels left behind by the changes and has lost confidence in the political system. This puts the country’s governance in jeopardy. This article proposes a seal for the country’s family agriculture as an instrument for promoting social and territorial cohesion. A seal that highlights the peasant origin of agricultural and agro-industrial products can enable producers to compete with imported products and ensure attractive sales channels with good prices. It can also have an important symbolic value, transmitting the message of solidarity and shared identity between the urban population and rural areas. In order for producers to perceive positive changes in the near future, several sales channels should be served simultaneously, namely supermarkets, hotels, restaurants, e-commerce and tourism. The certification process should be robust and at the same time simple, to avoid delays and high costs.

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Sustainable public procurement as a tool to foster sustainable development in Costa Rica: challenges and recommendations for policy implementation

In 2015, Costa Rica was the first country in Latin America to approve a National Policy for Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP). In 2018, a research team from DIE studied the efforts to make SPP a reality in Costa Rica and developed policy conclusions, partly drawing on international experience. The challenges to a swift implementation of SPP in Costa Rica are manifold: The fragmented governance in public administration impedes joint efforts and coordinated action among institutions of the central government, (semi-)autonomous institutions and municipalities. Many decision-makers do not feel sufficiently qualified or trained to take decisions which guarantee a good “sustainability for cost”-ratio and at the same time correspond to the legal requirements for public procurement. Dialogue structures between public procurers and the private sector are not well developed and this is a barrier to the effective framing of SPP processes. Several actions are considered both feasible and necessary to accelerate SPP implementation in this Central American country. They reach from reforming the modes of public procurement, improving public-private dialogues and strengthening support institutions to making stronger efforts to ensure that SPP contributes to mitigating social challenges in Costa Rica.

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Value Chain Development: Approaches and activities by seven UN agencies and opportunities for interagency cooperation

Promoting value chain development is increasingly being recognized as a promising approach to address not only economic development, job creation and inclusive growth, but a wider range of social and environmental development issues. The paper outlines the different approaches and perspectives that seven UN agencies apply in their work on value chain development. It also points to some of the challenges the UN system is facing in enhancing its effectiveness and coherence and offers some initial consideration for how the UN system could leverage its strengths further in value chaindevelopment.

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Agribusiness and poverty reduction: what can be learned from the value chain approach?

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), adopted by the Millennium Summit of 2000 commit the international community to a strategy of accelerated poverty reduction. The proportion of people living under conditions of extreme poverty should be reduced by half by the year 2015 (MDG 1). The MDGs are today the most significant point of reference for international development policy, cooperation and research (see e.g. Fues and Loewe 2005). The commitment to MDG has led to intensified research on the question, which factors influence the poverty reducing effects of economic growth and to the search for growth patterns that have a more direct impact on poverty than mere ‘trickle down’ processes (Kakwani, Khandker and Son 2004).

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Strengthening value chains in Sri Lanka's agribusiness: a way to reconcile competitiveness with socially inclusive growth?
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