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Khalid Nadvi

University of Manchester

Khalid Nadvi is a Political Economist specializing on issues relating to trade and industrial development, heading the Global Development Institute at the University of Manchester. His work has focused on small enterprise clusters, global value chains and production networks, global standards, corporate social responsibility and technological upgrading.
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Launch Event: How Supply Chain Research Can Help Solving Societal Challenges
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publication
COVID-19 and the case for global development

COVID-19 accentuates the case for a global, rather than an international, development paradigm. The novel disease is a prime example of a development challenge for all countries, through the failure of public health as a global public good. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the falsity of any assumption that the global North has all the expertise and solutions to tackle global challenges, and has further highlighted the need for multi-directional learning and transformation in all countries towards a more sustainable and equitable world. We illustrate our argument for a global development paradigm by examining the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic across four themes or 'vignettes': global value chains, digitalisation, debt, and climate change. We conclude that development studies must adapt to a very different context from when the field emerged in the mid-20th century.

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Understanding regional value chains through the interaction of public and private governance: Insights from Southern Africa’s apparel sector

Regional value chains (RVCs) and South–South trade are increasingly considered key features of 21st-century globalisation. This article investigates how RVCs are shaped by the interaction of private and public governance. It evaluates how this interaction unfolded in Southern Africa’s apparel RVCs, exploring trade, investment and labour regimes across three levels of analysis: national, regional, and global. The paper draws on trade data, secondary literature, and interviews with suppliers and institutions in Eswatini and Lesotho (the largest exporters to the region), and lead firms in South Africa (the largest regional importer). The findings underline the critical role of public governance in shaping retailers’ and suppliers’ participation in RVCs through: (i) regional ‘trade regimes’ protecting regional exporters from global competitors, and recent shifts in global trade regimes; (ii) national and regional ‘investment regimes’ facilitating investment flows from South Africa to Lesotho and Eswatini, and the more recent shift of US-oriented suppliers towards regional markets; and (iii) ‘labour regimes’, including lower wages, less comprehensive labour legislation and weaker trade unions in Lesotho and Eswatini compared to South Africa. The article concludes by considering the policy implications of the interaction of private and public governance for existing and future RVCs in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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The influence of tariff regimes on global production networks (GPNs)

Despite the recognition that trade policy—in particular, tariff regimes and rules of origin—can affect the geography of production, much GPN analyses pay scant attention to the tariff context of the sector studied. This paper proposes an analytical framework to more effectively integrate these regimes into applied GPN research. We test the framework, drawing on analysis of exports to the EU market in four sectors: textiles and apparel, floriculture, fisheries and leather goods. The analysis confirms that, in the presence of high tariffs, preferences do seem to impact on sourcing for the EU market.

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