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Christina Saulich

German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP)

Christina Saulich is Associate at the German Institute for International and Security Affais (SWP) in the project Transnational Governance of Sustainable Commodity Supply Chains. She received her M.A. degree in International Relations from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Free University Berlin and the University of Potsdam and her Ph.D. degree from the University of Koblenz-Landau. Christina’s research centres on industrial and resource policy in Southern Africa, the governance of global value chains (GVCs), sustainability in the platinum supply chain, and political economy in Southern Africa.
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publication
Responsibility in Supply Chains - Germany’s Due Diligence Act Is a Good Start

On 3 March, the Federal Cabinet adopted an act on corporate due diligence in supply chains. This represents an important step towards German businesses assuming full and proper responsibility for the supply chains associated with their goods and services. The move puts Germany in a group of European countries like France and the Netherlands that have already instituted legal frameworks of their own. However, by choosing to exclude civil liability the German government has left aside a powerful tool for applying targeted pressure to companies that fail to fulfil their obligations. In order to maximise the law’s impact, the German Bundestag and government should therefore adopt additional flanking measures. At the European and international levels, Germany can also contribute to making companies assume greater responsibility for their own supply chains.

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publication
Accessing Global Value Chains: The Politics of Promoting Export-Driven Industrialisation and Upgrading in the Mozambican Cashew Processing Industry

This working paper focuses on the question: How does politics shape the promotion of export-driven industrialisation and firm-level upgrading in Sub-Saharan Africa? It exemplifies this question with an in-depth, qualitative study of the cashew processing industry in Mozambique in the period from 1991 until 2019. The paper links the political settlements framework, global value chain (GVC) analysis and the research on technological capabilities to explore why the Mozambican Government supported the cashew processing industry and how Mozambican politics shaped the governance of the local cashew value chain and the upgrading paths of local value chain actors. The paper argues that the Mozambican Government supported the cashew processing industry because it became important for the Government’s political survival. In 1999, it adopted a protectionist cashew law that facilitated the re-emergence of the cashew processing industry after its breakdown. The law and the active involvement of the National Cashew Institute (INCAJU) affected the governance of the local cashew value chain, the creation of backward linkages, and the upgrading paths of cashew processors. The paper reveals that the learning channels of firms in global value chains with market-based or modular governance that operate in countries where industrial policies are not enforced effectively may be limited. Firms therefore mainly depend on costly learning channels at firm level, such as learning by doing or hiring skilled labour, and/or on technical assistance from donors to build the technological capabilities needed to access global value chains and to remain competitive. This paper illustrates how to bring politics into the study of upgrading by broadening the analytical focus of GVC analysis to include domestic political settlements and state-business relations, next to the study of firms.

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publication
Das Konfliktpotential großer Rohstoffvorkommen in Mosambik

Current protests and acts of violence have sparked a debate on a potential resource curse in Mozambique. This paper analyses the role of resource abundance in recent societal conflicts in Mozambique. The strand of literature on resources and conflicts sheds no light on the underlying structural sources of conflict in resource rich countries. The authors therefore draw on Edward E. Azar’s model of Protracted Social Conflicts with the aim to develop an analytical framework that combines Azar’s conflict theory with the literature on resources and conflict. The research framework is illustrated using the example of Mozambique. Thereby this paper contributes to the literature on resources and conflict by showing how Azar’s model of Protracted Social Conflicts can be used for analysing conflicts in resource abundant countries. Furthermore, it provides a better understanding of the role of resources in recent conflicts in Mozambique and discusses approaches to conflict transformation.

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publication
A local to global perspective on resource governance and conflict

This article serves as an introduction to the special issue ‘A Local to Global Perspective on Resource Governance and Conflict’. It advances the debate on natural resource governance and conflict by bringing together three different strands of literature with the aim of developing a local to global research perspective and framework for analysis. First, this article reviews and identifies research gaps in the literatures on (1) the resource curse, (2) environmental security and (3) the large-scale acquisition of land and natural resources. Second, it addresses the previously identified research gaps by developing a local to global research perspective and a corresponding analytical framework. The final section of this contribution summarises the key findings of the articles presented in the special issue and outlines their policy implications.

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